Our Thoughts Tonight

The Beatles: Get Back Documentary Review

December 16, 2021 Our Thoughts Tonight
Our Thoughts Tonight
The Beatles: Get Back Documentary Review
Show Notes Transcript

Tonight in a special edition of our thoughts tonight we review The Beatles: Get Back documentary which can be seen on Disney Plus. 

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Speaker 1:

Song , or there's so much unwillingness to get in a vulnerable state with their dynamic. Like they're so unwilling to get into conversations that are not beyond the surface, that they cannot stop joking. It seems welcome

Speaker 2:

To our thoughts tonight. Join us as we chat in a mellow moon without music , philosophy, psychology, and anything else that will come to mind, enjoy

Speaker 1:

Our thoughts tonight. How goes it? I am your host Ringo star , and I am here with Zach . How's it going? How are you doing? Pretty good. All right . So this is a special of our thoughts tonight, tonight.

Speaker 3:

Just the two of us,

Speaker 1:

Just the two of us. And , uh, what are we gonna talk about today, Zach ?

Speaker 3:

We're gonna talk about the Beatles documentary by Peter Jackson called get back . It's a three part documentary and it had like over 150 hours and a lot more audio than that. But Peter Jackson whittled it down to like three parts. It's like seven plus hours or something like that. But yeah, that's what we're gonna talk about tonight. And

Speaker 1:

Last year around this time, I think it was maybe a little bit later last

Speaker 3:

Year. I think it was right after Christmas.

Speaker 1:

It was right after Christmas, like the 28th or something like that. Yeah . McCartney three , uh , Paul McCartney's solo album. Yeah . McCartney three came out and we did a review of that on our thoughts tonight. And that strangely enough was our most popular episode.

Speaker 3:

Yeah . Controversy.

Speaker 1:

That's why, yeah. The controversy, because I did not give it a good review that's

Speaker 3:

For sure. I liked it, but <affirmative> , I didn't like it enough to listen to it again. Yeah. But that's a whole nother story on a later

Speaker 1:

Episode. Yeah . Or past episode you had passed episode, go back and listen to it. It is. Yeah . Pretty, pretty interesting. And Sean , our co-host that passed away. Yeah. He was on last , uh, earlier this year also on that one. So it's a great conversation. Yeah. But today we're gonna be focusing on the Beatles. Get back before that as always crew Jim sunk him . We are back on our thoughts tonight and we're going to be talking about the, get back , get back the Beatles documentary that came out a few months, about a month ago or so now I think it was a month

Speaker 3:

Ago. Mm-hmm <affirmative>

Speaker 1:

Late November, I think on November Disney plus

Speaker 3:

It was the first thing I came back to watch , I think, after Vegas.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah. Yeah. That's a good

Speaker 3:

Way. I was like, but do first thing. I was like, oh wow, this is awesome. This is the best thing I could possibly watch right now. Just like, usually you put things on to like numb your mind or whatever, but this was one of those films where you're just completely sucked in and everything's tuned out. And you're , if you love the Beatles, as much as we do, then your , your focal points are completely on the screen the whole time for seven plus hours.

Speaker 1:

A hundred percent . Yeah. I was definitely paying attention to a lot of things that I wondered in terms of, you know, their process and how , how their , uh , dynamics are between one another. And we'll get into that in a bit. But you said you had a question.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah. Let's kick it off like this. How would you rate the film from one to

Speaker 1:

10? From one to 10, 10 being the best? Yeah.

Speaker 3:

One being the worst.

Speaker 1:

That's a tough one. Yeah. From what perspective? Like just in general.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, just in general or like a fan's perspective from a fan perspective or like just watching the musical process of mm-hmm <affirmative> them writing songs. Just like overall though. That's what the question was like. Mm-hmm <affirmative> would you rate the whole film overall?

Speaker 1:

I think it, it gets a , I would give it a , a nine outta 10. Yeah. That's what I was

Speaker 3:

Nine outta 10. I was gonna say last time you're like, make the outta it . <laugh> <laugh>

Speaker 1:

Yeah . With a McCartney three . Yeah . That was the whole contentious point of that. Yeah, because you gave it like a nine outta 10. I , and I was like, ah , nine outta 10. Yeah, I know . Yeah , no, but I would give this a nine outta 10 because the there's for one, the , the raw substance is there. Yeah. It is such a great time in music for them, even though it was like past their prime, arguably.

Speaker 3:

And they , and in hindsight, Paul and Ringo thought that it was like the worst time. And I guess in some aspects, after watching that film, you could see why Uhhuh . But I think they forgot about like how much fun they actually had, you know, mm-hmm <affirmative> but I feel like a lot of the problems that they had within the band was like, Paul, like you think so, but between the four of them. Yeah . Cause I like George wanted to go and do his own thing. And then I think Ringo left briefly too for a little bit.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. He left during the white album,

Speaker 3:

But you could see like on the first , um, on the first episode, it's not a bad thing either that Paul contributes so much mm-hmm <affirmative> but you can see the contrast between all four of them and how much all of them have grown up and how all of them have their own outlooks on how they want to write songs. But because they're all , they're all of them . So many of them are creative in their own way and have their own style that it's like butting heads with each other to try to fight, to get their songs onto the album. But I feel like Paul got them most songs on the album still. Absolutely . George got like two and John got like half as much as Paul,

Speaker 1:

But yeah, I agree. I think, I think , uh , the reason, what I was trying to say was like the substances there, even though they might arguably be past their prime, but still, I don't know . Yeah. It it's good. It's good. I feel ,

Speaker 3:

I feel like it's healthy, you know? Yeah. Like that's what happens when you're in bands.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. What , what stood out to me was how , uh, functional they actually were. Yeah . How they wanted to make it work. Yeah . For the most part, even though, even, even though George left. Yeah . He, even, he, once he came back was all gung ho . They just wanted to make it happen. And then it was just a matter of agreeing on what they wanted to do, which is agreeing on, was shocking to me. Because you could see like when they got in like a huddle, those guys were family for one another. Yeah . They were , they were all they had, they grew up together, you know? So there was a real intimate in interpersonal relationship within them that I don't think anybody ever had seen in the past. Oh, I remember what I was gonna say about why I gave it a nine outta 10. Because if you look at the, let it be documentary, which uses parts of the same footage, it's complete garbage. Yeah. It's complete garbage. I've

Speaker 3:

Never seen it. It's bad. Yeah . Sorry . I shouldn't

Speaker 1:

Say that . They focus on, on that moment where George leaves and it's it's uh , directed. Oh , so they just

Speaker 3:

Drag it on. Yeah. That the , a like five minute part that's in the story park documentary. Exactly . They turn it into like an hour

Speaker 1:

Out of all that footage. Yeah. That's , it's a , it's directed by , uh , Michael Lindsay hog . The he's in the documentary quite a bit. And both, both of the documentaries that I think he's on the rooftop too. He's on the rooftop. Oh, so he was, he had a lot of, I mean he directed the, he told the cameras like what? To film and stuff. Yeah. So he,

Speaker 3:

He was like filming all the time. Yeah. And he was asking the band in the film. He was like, should we film this? I was like, I don't even, I think , uh , it was John he's like, I don't even know why we're filming anymore. George doesn't even hear he's like, are we even

Speaker 1:

Beatles? It's good that they filmed that obviously

Speaker 3:

He's like, we're the bootles <laugh>

Speaker 1:

So yeah. I think it was good for that reason. What do you think out 10, one out or from one to 10, 10 being the highest?

Speaker 3:

I I'd give it nine outta 10 too . Nine outta 10.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Yeah . I agree . No reason why I give it nine out 10 and not 10 out 10 is because like it's because like some of like the audio didn't match with mm-hmm <affirmative> , um, the footage, but I understand why, like that's a really, really hard thing to do. You would know. Yeah. Yeah . You know, but uh , taking someone else's work and going through like 150 something hours, you know, of a footage and audio on top of it and trying to match it and make it look presentable and have good transitions and make it flow the whole entire way, you know? Oh yeah. I have a question. All right . It ties into the question. Okay . It's uh , do you think that the director, Peter Jackson did a great job at editing the whole video and audio on the film?

Speaker 1:

Uh, I think he did about as, probably as good as you can get. Yeah . And it , and not adding what I liked is that there was no name narrator, so there was no , uh, you know, voice of God there and, and that they , they just used text for those moments. Yeah . And the thing that I was impressed with the most, which I actually took inspiration from, for my latest YouTube video mm-hmm <affirmative> uh, was when Paul is sitting there , uh , writing get he's trying to come up with something. And he is like in the process of writing get back. Yeah . And you're watching him and you're just like, oh, you just think it's Paul playing something, right. Something arbitrary. But then the text comes up and it's like, the , uh, Paul is scrambling to come up with some , uh, because they're running out of time.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. They got like two weeks to write 12 songs or something like that.

Speaker 1:

Uhhuh <affirmative> . And he says something along the lines of, or the text says something along the lines of what's about to take place is that Paul is about to write the next single for the Beatles. Yeah. And because he says that in the text, you know, what's gonna happen and as you're watching it, but, and , and it, like, it builds suspense.

Speaker 3:

It builds , uh , what's the word I'm looking for. Yeah. Suspense.

Speaker 1:

It's really cool. I think that was an interesting thing. Like just say, what's about to happen and we watch. Yeah . And your attention is grabbed immediately . I thought that was powerful.

Speaker 3:

It builds tension. That's what I was gonna say completely. Yeah. You're like, that's when you read that text, I don't know about you, but me. I was, I was like, oh , my eyes were like glued to the screen . Oh. Anticipation,

Speaker 1:

Anticipation. Yeah . That's what I was looking . And the way I use that in the, in the most recent YouTube video was if you do watch my YouTube. Right . So , um , there's a moment where the , this , this is totally unrelated, but , uh , it's about how communism and , uh , the red scare and all that. So I say something along the lines of , uh, after world war II , you know, things changed and America is about to enter. One of the most was controversial moments or one of the most controversial eras in its history. Yeah. So as I say that, you know, we watch the rest of the video is one of the most controversial eras in America's history. Yeah. And I got that exactly from the get back thing. Yeah. Like the phrasing and everything. I just changed what the topic was because it was so powerful to me. So I think he did a great job specifically. That moment, I think was like that. And the very end, how he built 10 builds tension at the very end with the cops entering. Oh

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Paul's face. Yeah. But during a song , I think it , that was so good. Yeah. He like turns around and he just like, goes up the microphone. He's like, woo . Yeah. <laugh> like, it made me laugh. I , I feel like I've thought so I've been in moments like that. They knew ,

Speaker 1:

He knew he was like, oh, we're in trouble. Yeah. He's like, but they can't

Speaker 3:

Come on the roof. There's too much weight. Yeah . He's like, we gotta band up here and like 40 people up here. And that's so good. Another thing too is like, I like how, when the cops arrived, they like didn't know what to do. And everyone that was in , uh , their recording studio, what , what is it called? Apple records.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. It's um,

Speaker 3:

It was funny to me that all the staff that work in the recording studio are just like, yeah , we don't know what's going on. Like they were just covering their back .

Speaker 1:

Yeah . It was like, it was definitely orchestrated to some extent you would think at least. Yeah. I think it was threes three SRO , which is , uh , the rooftop of , uh , the building apple core

Speaker 3:

Apple Corp . Okay. That was right. Yeah . But yeah, that , that was hilarious to me. And then when the cops finally do make their way up, they just end up standing there in the doorway, basically just watching the Beatles mm-hmm <affirmative> and if they're still alive to this day and they, I , I wonder what their perspective is,

Speaker 1:

The guy, the main cop. I can't remember his name . Yeah . The guy that

Speaker 3:

Was talking he's like , you gotta turn it

Speaker 1:

Down. Yeah. They interviewed him and he says , uh, that he was just doing what, what he was to do and that he had no, he didn't enter there with any animosity. Yeah. And that, he was just, you know, he didn't know what was going on and he didn't enter there with any animosity. Just wanted to tell them like, Hey, look, there's people complaining. And he says, he feels no remorse. Uh , like he's like, I was just doing my job. Yeah. And they asked him if like the Beatles. And he said, yeah, I like them. I didn't really like them during their Hardy Krishna phase. But yeah . And he says it in hindsight, like, yeah. He enjoys them and all that. That's cool.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. It's probably pretty historical for him.

Speaker 1:

Definitely. I mean, he's a part of it. Yeah. He's probably cool to see. Yeah. He's a , he's in his seventies now. Wow.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. That's crazy.

Speaker 1:

Let's take a quick break and we'll do right back. And we have some more interesting questions and reviews about, get back the Beatles documentary.

Speaker 3:

And we are back in the us S R

Speaker 1:

On our thoughts tonight. We're back talking about, get back the documentary. And I have a question for you, Zach . What, so we talked about the editing and we talked about the ranking.

Speaker 3:

Yeah . The ranking and bunch of stories in between and the good parts.

Speaker 1:

But what do you think could have been different about the documentary? What would, what would you have liked to have seen be done differently or added in or taken out more,

Speaker 3:

More footage, longer story, more parts. That's what I'd like, like as a fan mm-hmm <affirmative>, you know, like it was three parts and it was seven hours. But I remember watching an interview of Peter Jackson talking about making it and like, he made it at his house. Mm-hmm <affirmative> , you know, in his studio with multiple people. Yeah . But he was like, we would take things out and then we're like, oh, this doesn't fit. Right. We need to put this back in. And then the further that we got into all of the film that we watched, there was just so many good parts. We couldn't take them out. Mm-hmm <affirmative> so we , we ended up, it was supposed to be a two hour film and we ended up pushing it to seven hours. Right . They had to ask Paul on Ringo yeah . For permission. And they said, yeah, well , they , they saw it too. Mm-hmm <affirmative> they were like, wow . I don't remember that. That's fun . I was, well, there's a lot of drinking too. Oh yeah . I

Speaker 1:

Saw when they were there's a

Speaker 3:

Few scenes there. Yeah. Like I think it was in part two, like halfway part through part two when they , they were writing songs and stuff and they added the piano player. I can't remember his name. The fifth Billy Preston. Yeah . Billy Preston. And he's a phenomenal piano player. Oh , yeah . Is so good . Out of all the things though, that's basically all, I wouldn't change anything about it. I would just add more footage and audio mm-hmm <affirmative> so I , I , I would like it to be like a four part or a six part or something like this, you know, mm-hmm <affirmative>, I don't think it would devalue it any less, if anything, it'd probably make it even better, you know ? Yeah.

Speaker 1:

For sure. I, I think that, yeah, it was, it was great, but the reason why I gave it nine outta 10 was I think it glossed over a lot of things that could have been focused on. I know that he, he didn't wanna focus too much on, on the issues, the dynamic issues, but I think there are certain things and , uh , there's a few criticisms of it that are also saying the same thing. It's like, it didn't mention the fact that John was addicted to heroin. I think it kind of glossed over a lot of those things and kind of repeatedly played the same songs. And I know that that's part of it, but I like that he was showing the moments where they're writing the songs. Yeah. It playing the constant jams, like the full jams. And , and I , I , I understand he's trying to show the evolution of the song. Yeah. But you could show that in moments. And I think that , uh, instead of doing that, what I would've done is focus more on the, in between and the , uh, the moments where they're talking and , and the dynamics there, which are the most important part of it. Yeah . For me. And it was great in everything, but that's the only thing I would've changed is the substance of the, the negative aspect of it. But I think he was well aware of the fact that this was going to be on Disney plus. So naturally there's a bias

Speaker 3:

There. It's got , it's gotta have some kind of filter on it, but there's also a warning thing too. It's like, it has alcohol and smoking. Mm-hmm <affirmative> and da , da , but it's not gonna say John Len's on heroin. Exactly. Yeah. But if you're a Beatles fan and you know, like some Beatles history, you would know during that time that you could tell in the documentary, like, there's a part where he like, shows up at lunch, like he looks hungover or something he's like, so I'm late boys. You're like, we're about to take a break. And he's like, and Paul's like, where have you been? And he's like, oh, just I overslept partied all night.

Speaker 1:

You know, I think that had a lot to do with why George left too. Yeah. You know, probably, you know, he wasn't about that. Yeah. George was so much smarter than those guys. Yeah . By comparison, you can just tell,

Speaker 3:

Not only that, but it must get really frustrating to be someone that's like, oh , creative. But your two best friends have been writing songs longer than you. And they write great songs. But then when you get to a point where Paul's telling you what to do and how to play it, mm-hmm <affirmative> . And then the other one that's supposedly the leader of the band or in control is like showing up late all the time. And you still can't get your input in while it's just one of them. Yeah. No

Speaker 1:

Wonder why he left. They barely, at least from the footage we saw, they barely spent any time on Georgia's songs. Yeah. But like , that's good. Let's move on. Yeah . Let's play one after 9 0 9 for the thousandth time. Yeah. I least there was , they spent so much time on get back and dig a pony and, and , uh , not I out a feeling. Yeah . And the other one, the John song and I'm complete , uh don't let me down. Yeah. Don't let

Speaker 3:

Me down ,

Speaker 1:

Uh , those songs they spent the most time on. Yeah. They played two

Speaker 3:

Clips of , uh, IME mine . Uh , which is that , that was the cool scene though. Mm-hmm <affirmative> cause he, it was just George playing and I think Ringo was drumming or, or , or he was just observing George play, showing them this and he , oh yeah . He already had the whole song, like written out was all there. He just needed , uh , uh , the chorus part. I need me mine or whatever. But , uh , John and yo are like Walt sing dancing. And J John's talking to George while he is playing this. He's like, well , this is great. This is write dance music. Like, I don't know if he was joking or not, but he was right too. Cuz it's like a 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3 . You're right.

Speaker 1:

Um , I think that, that's an example of what I'm trying to say is like George would show up with a complete song. Yeah. Because he probably understood had he not shown up with a complete song. They would've never spent the time to , to complete that song. And that in itself is, is an example of, I think why George was clearly more intelligent than these guys because in order for, and I'm not saying that that Paul and, and John weren't intelligent, but from a , from a psychological perspective that if somebody is not challenged by people, mm-hmm , <affirmative> , they're going to think every decision they make is correct. Yeah. And Paul and Jo Paul and John, they were probably never denied anything during the period that they were in the Beatles. Everyone was a yes man to them. Yeah . Except for maybe George Martin or one of the other Beatles. But George, on the other hand, everyone outside of the Beatles said yes, yes, yes. To him. But when he was trying to make his songs, George or I mean, John and Paul were very tough on him. So he had a sense of friction in his life. And his sense of friction is what really makes a person intelligence. And, and you can see by the way he behaves, by the way he writes songs, by the way, he , he's way more aware of his surroundings. He's observant, observant. And he's kind of just past it the whole time you see, like this guy is miles ahead of these guy eyes at this point, you're just scanning this video from my point of view. Yeah . I'm watching, I'm watching this documentary and the whole time I'm thinking like George is like looking to have this, like this umbilical chord cut so he can run, you know? And he talks about that. Yeah, he does. I really like that part where me too, he's asking John what he should do. And , uh ,

Speaker 3:

John is all excited to about that , uh, manager guy. Cause he's like, he , he knows us better than we know each other. Oh , he was

Speaker 1:

Fooled. Yeah. He was because that, guy's just telling them. And I don't know, but I'm assuming when I heard that I was like this, guy's just telling John what he wants to hear. Yeah. And it works . And that's what John likes, because he's been told what he's wanted to hear. Yeah. And it's just that this guy is , is telling them, you know, he's whoever he was. I can't remember his name. I read, I read, read about him after I heard this part. And, and he did actually end up taking the, the manager position of the Beatles for the last year or so if I'm not mistaken and he was just trying to be, he was just trying to make money, you know? Yeah . He knew that the Beatles were a cash cow. Yeah . So yeah, he is gonna , he's gonna know about John and , and , and what he likes to smoke. Yeah . You know, because he is trying to make some money. Yeah. But he probably that's a problem with these like young people that get in contracts and stuff, they get shafted because they, they are , they don't know what to do.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. And they see it just like as an opportunity, not a shafting. Exactly. You're like, this would never happen. This has never happened

Speaker 1:

To me. And it never happened to them before. I think either when, when Brian Epstein was still alive, which is , you know, also they talk about that. Like when, when Brian was around mm-hmm , <affirmative> , you know, they never dealt with these things like ambiguity and like decision making because Brian Epstein clearly made the best decisions for them. Yeah. And because the band fell apart after that. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

They were trying to figure out what to do, but they were clashing. It was like a clash of glans with each other mm-hmm <affirmative> and they all had different paths. They were trying to go down. Do

Speaker 1:

You think they would've stayed together for longer if Epstein was still alive? Yeah, I think so.

Speaker 3:

It was cool seeing , uh , uh , George Martin there.

Speaker 1:

Oh my God. George Martin was my favorite part of the whole thing. He's so cool.

Speaker 3:

He's like, oh, let me let come in here real fast, Paul. I was like, why don't you try this? <laugh> I feel like he's just a very soft spoken person or he he's seen the evolution of these , uh , boys

Speaker 1:

He's met from day one. Yeah. I mean, you know, at least from the studio days on. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

And it's probably just a trip for him now. He's like, oh, these boys are wearing fur jackets and writing . Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Get back. I was thinking the same thing. I was like, you know, he saw them from please, please me. Yeah. Enough recording. Love me too. And now they're yeah. Wearing these funny coats and polka dot . Yeah . You know, button downs, red ring coats. He's just like, yeah . They've evolved. And they've, he doesn't like really say much. Yeah. Because he, he knows that he knows who they are, who they are and that he, anything he would add would only just maybe even get in the way of what they're already going to do. And I'm sure he knew that long before that feel documentary,

Speaker 3:

I feel like also he was a icebreaker between them when arguments would start boiling up. Mm-hmm <affirmative> like, I feel like he'd step in. Like, he seems like that type of person. Yeah . For sure .

Speaker 1:

I don't know . He is older than them. Yeah. Kinda reminds. I think that that's what used to happen in the past too. Yeah .

Speaker 3:

I've read about that. It's like Mr . Rogers and the Beatles mm-hmm <affirmative> that can play that's that's

Speaker 1:

What I got from even, he was so young in this . I know . I mean , you look at him . He is probably in his thirties, late thirties. Everything's like the best rest person there. Yeah. I

Speaker 3:

Know. I was like this guy's dressed like Frank Sinatra. Yeah. This is awesome.

Speaker 1:

He's so cool. Yeah. What do you think was unexpected? Like what, what did you not expect to see?

Speaker 3:

Um, well, you know, the rumors like, oh, Yoko broke up the band or whatever. Mm-hmm <affirmative> I felt like there was a lot more tension with Paul McCartney and the rest to the three Beatles than there was with Yoko mm-hmm <affirmative> you know what I mean? Like that's, that's what you're told. It's like a rumor, you know, but then when you see this, she's just sitting there, like being respectful. Yeah . And then like, there was one time though where like Paul and Yoko and I think John was playing drums and they were all just jamming. OK . Was yelling into a mic mm-hmm <affirmative> but she was invited into it. It's not like she was walking up to the mic.

Speaker 1:

Like it was clearly that they were just killing time. Yeah. Cause

Speaker 3:

It was very clear . The other two weren't there. And um, sorry, can you repeat the question one more

Speaker 1:

Time? I wanna , yeah. What was unexpected, but before you go on, I wanna say yeah, that the whole Yoko, Oho , uh , being the, the reason why, the reason why, and just this , uh , this mean lady, I think the expression for that is a

Speaker 3:

<laugh> I think this documentary debunked

Speaker 1:

That yeah, exactly. Theory . That was a media generated narrative. I don't, I don't believe that to be true. You know , the media has to write about at something. Yeah. And especially in the sixties where, you know, the feminist movement hadn't even taken off yet . I think that that happened in the seventies. Yeah. Like the second wave, if I'm not mistaken. So, I mean, there was a hatred, there still is a hatred for women, but there was definitely a hatred for women in that time. Yeah. And she was a scapegoat mm-hmm <affirmative> for, you know, she was the answer to the problems breakup anyway.

Speaker 3:

Um, I think the, the thing that threw me off the most, so was , um, the tension that at all of them had with Paul mm-hmm <affirmative> oh yeah. Throughout the whole entire process , uh, control of writing songs, control of telling people what to do in the band control of making decisions, but not like talking to all of them immediately, you know , uh, that also resided with John too. But I feel like John was a lot more, I feel like Paul was just like trying to prove himself in a way too , John, but in a position of power like that, I feel like John held it together. Mm-hmm <affirmative> a lot , uh , a lot better than Paul did. I agree. But when it comes to , that might have been the heroin. Probably he was very calm. He seemed

Speaker 1:

To be more calm than you would think. Right. Yeah. But you know, I don't know if that is, I'm just speculating.

Speaker 3:

And another thing too is , um, when they were writing songs and they were just being goofy and like basically just off and like drinking and smoking and cracking jokes and Doza ropes and all these things, you know, mm-hmm <affirmative> but they were making progress and songs still, like it's crazy to me to see like how unorganized some certain parts were, but how much progression of songwriting got done. Yeah. That was

Speaker 1:

The most shocking thing that was shocking to me too. Like the second episode starts and they're playing, I dig a pony and I'm like, when did they write this? They didn't even play it in the first part. Yeah. I , so that was really strange. Yeah. And they all knew how to play it. So it's like, when did they sit and learn that

Speaker 3:

Riff? It's a part of that 150 hours. It should have been in that eight part document. Exactly . It's part

Speaker 1:

Should have included that.

Speaker 3:

Yeah . It's parts like that though. You spend too

Speaker 1:

Much time showing moments where Paul and John were just digging around and like doing those things. And those were great to see, but I mean, I actually even skipped a lot of that in the second because it was, it was like watching to emotionally volved children or men. Yeah . Acting my children. And I was like, this is kind of like, it's great, cuz these guys are like, you know, we're my heroes. They are my heroes still. I don't really have a hero complex with anybody anymore. I try not to, I should say. But it's like, I don't want to , I don't know . It's not that I don't wanna see that. But also I don't wanna see that because I hold these guys in very high esteem. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

And it's like welcome to the life of George Harrison. What I noticed,

Speaker 1:

One, one take I had was when I was watching it. Exactly. I felt like George in the corner. Cause George is sitting there criticizing these guys. Not in a judgemental way, but he's just like, come on, can we write the song? Or there's so much unwillingness to get in a vulnerable state with their dynamic. Like they're so unwilling to get into conversations that are not beyond the surface that they cannot stop joking. It seems. Yeah. Like that's a kind of like a psychoanalysis, but yeah . I mean every moment somebody is silent or moment that there is like something that maybe said that's serious, John or Paul crack a joke about it. It's just like, they're unwilling. It's like a defense mechanism. Exactly. They're unwilling to be vulnerable. And that is very evident in why George walks away. Yeah . And even Ringo, you know? Yeah . Is really quiet a lot of

Speaker 3:

The time too. I think that part that you're talking about though, that you skipped over was like right after George

Speaker 1:

Left. Yeah. So what you were saying, it was right after

Speaker 3:

It was right after George left. So I feel like they didn't know what to do with themselves. Cuz he actually walked out. He is like, I'll see you at a pub somewhere sometime or mm-hmm <affirmative> you know what I mean? It

Speaker 1:

Wasn't that. And then part two at times or

Speaker 3:

They're trying to get him back. Yeah . Still. And, and they're having problems trying to get him. They tried three times, I think two or three times to go convince George and he didn't come back until it was like on his terms . Yeah. You know ,

Speaker 1:

That's good. The whole TV show nonsense. Yeah . They would've never been able to pull it off. It wouldn't have been good.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. No . And that's another thing too. They could of pushing the date like another week they

Speaker 1:

Had no idea what they were doing. They had no idea. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

That's what I'm saying. Like it just seems like one giant cluster. mm-hmm <affirmative> but something great came out of it for sure. Which is pretty amazing in itself. I

Speaker 1:

Was gonna say, instead of putting a lot of the things or as the Beatle was not in , in terms of the documentary, but in that moment, instead of joking so much, they could have spent some time on George's songs. Yeah. That's what they should have done. Yeah . But uh, who am I? I was , I was not in that band.

Speaker 3:

I was surprised that they didn't do that, but I feel like they kind of did like, I don't think, I mean , mine would've been on the album if George didn't leave mm-hmm <affirmative> , you know, like that's a good song, but I , I don't know if that's true or not. That's just , John didn't

Speaker 1:

Even play on that song.

Speaker 3:

Not, not John. I said, George, I

Speaker 1:

Know, but John didn't play on that song. Yeah. So if I'm not mistaken, I'm gonna look this up. But

Speaker 3:

Just letting, letting the song itself that George wrote be on album. Yeah. He

Speaker 1:

Muscled his way in it by leaving. Yeah. By

Speaker 3:

Leaving. I Don it would've been on there. If not, and I don't know, there was footage of him playing old brown shoe. Yeah. And that, that was great. And then he was like trying to play the piano and he couldn't figure it out. <laugh> and then , uh , the other guy came what's his name again? The piano play . Billy Preston. Billy Preston. Yeah. Yeah . He's a great pianist.

Speaker 1:

Definitely. I was gonna say if I'm not mistaken, George wasn't I mean, John wasn't on the recording of, I mean mine and that in itself says something like, yeah . He didn't even wanna bother being on one of the recordings. No . For some reason. So you see a lot of the happy moments, but why didn't they show why George wasn't there while they were getting the final recording of Ivy mind there it's a three piece for sake . Yeah. If I'm not mistaken, I we'll look this up. Yeah. Uh, we should take a quick break though. And then I want to ask you about the songs on the record. Let's talk about that a little bit. If , and , and yeah. Among other things sounds good. We are back on our thoughts tonight. And I did fact check myself on the,

Speaker 3:

I mean mine ,

Speaker 1:

George Harris , I mean mine . Yeah. And whether John played on it or not, and he didn't, he wasn't in the studio. Yeah . I believe when they were. Yeah. He didn't play on it. And I guess, yeah, this was a problem obviously for

Speaker 3:

George. Yeah . When George presented it to them at uh what's what's the place called?

Speaker 1:

Wingham something like that. Wingham

Speaker 3:

I don't know . Wilton whatever some weird

Speaker 1:

Was Wingham yeah .

Speaker 3:

Okay. Yeah. When George presented it to them at Wingham , uh, we talked about this earlier, John was waltzing with , uh , Yoko, cuz he had no interest in it at all.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, exactly. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

That's kind of sad.

Speaker 1:

So in terms of the album, let's pull up the album, let it be

Speaker 3:

Letter B letter B the letter

Speaker 1:

B in terms of the album, what song would you say is the best song on the album? And what song would you say is the worst? Uh , we have two of us dig a pony across the universe. IMY mine . Dig it . Let it be. And may

Speaker 3:

I don't even think digit is a song. No,

Speaker 1:

It's like , it's like a 50 seconds long inter interlude.

Speaker 3:

It's interlude. Yeah. And

Speaker 1:

Watching the aside too is I've got a feeling one after 9 0 9 long and winding road for you blue and get back, man.

Speaker 3:

That's hard. Mm-hmm <affirmative> like on the first side , I like three of those songs, like immediately it's um , I dig a pony across the universe. And um, what , what , what was the one other one I'm trying to remember. Two of us. Yeah. Two of us is those are my three favorite songs on this whole album .

Speaker 1:

So dig a pony, two of us and which one? I got a feeling. Yeah,

Speaker 3:

No , I got a feeling. It was a , I've got a feeling. I got dementia. I can't remember what

Speaker 1:

A three , two of us dig a pony across the universe. Yeah. Across the universe. Yeah. Those are the first three on the album. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

And I like those three songs. Yeah. Uh , my least favorite song. Let it be overplayed. A hundred percent overshadowed. Every single song on that album.

Speaker 1:

Every on the album. I , I can't stand that song and you can

Speaker 3:

See the boredom in George's eyes and John John's laying down on Yoko Ono's lap. Yeah. He's like, when do I come in? I only got two chords. That what? I mean? Yeah . And Ringo just looks like he's about to fall asleep and he's like asking someone for a drink while John's like playing. Let it be over and over and over and over again. And they're they look like they're losing their minds in George's eyes. He's like, I came back for this. <laugh> cause this is after he seriously, it's a boring song . He doesn't say it, but

Speaker 1:

It's the progression is bored . The lyrics are sentimental. Yeah . In a , in a really lame way.

Speaker 3:

I, I don't think it's a bad song.

Speaker 1:

No , it's a phenomenal song, but it's

Speaker 3:

Boring. It's a beautiful song. I love it. When I first heard it when I was like nine, but I've heard it overplayed so many times. Like I'd rather hear me . I'm amazed by Paul McCartney. I listen to that song on repeat. Maybe

Speaker 1:

I'm amazed. <laugh>

Speaker 3:

Yeah, but I can't listen to let it be like, whenever I listen to that album, I'd skip. Let it be out . Same

Speaker 1:

Every time I would say my least favorite is let it be.

Speaker 3:

It's funny cuz it's the name of the album.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. My favorite it , I would have to say is the long and winding road, which is like good too . If you were to take, let it be and make a more interesting song. Yeah . You'd get the long and

Speaker 3:

Winding road. The long and winding road is phenomenal song. It's like a masterpiece.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. And that's funny because I used to say for years that was my least favorite Beatles song. And then one day I heard it in a different way. <laugh> yeah . And I was like, what? This is so good. Yeah . And I think what was , what turned me off from that song was the Phil specter mix. Yeah, because the version I heard was from that Beatles movie yesterday. Yeah. And that version was, you know, a stripped down version of it without the stupid horns and all the. And that changed it for me, not even the Paul version, but then I went back and listened to the Paul version without the horns and on the, let it be naked.

Speaker 3:

And he didn't even like the horns and stuff. He didn't want it in there.

Speaker 1:

Mm-hmm no, he didn't. Yeah. I'm pretty sure there was a lawsuit regarding that mix.

Speaker 3:

You write a beautiful song and then they just put a bunch of horns over it. It's. Yeah. Just let the man and his piano play. You don't need 50

Speaker 1:

Seriously. That's one other thing I noticed is like, you know, when we were in a band, I was kind of like the Paul figure in a sense, because I was always kind of driving the songwriting. Yeah. But the only reason was because nobody else was going to do it. Not you because when we start writing the songs, you would jump in and, and add to things. But you were the drummer. Yeah . So in terms of like riffs, the other guys didn't say,

Speaker 3:

I have the option to just sit there and be like, okay, what are we gonna play? And then when you're like, you can play now we'll figure something out. Just play laying this time signature. Yeah. You know, then I do it, but then I start experimenting. Exactly. That's my job. Or you you're like,

Speaker 1:

Hey let's we should try this instead. Or whatever. Like you would add to it. Yeah . Because you weren't composing any of the riffs. Yeah. But you had ideas, nonetheless, these guys in our band, they would just stand there like statues. They would play the riffs. They would play the songs, but they just stand there with no ideas. It's like every now

Speaker 3:

And then , uh , occasionally he would have

Speaker 1:

An idea, but, and I'm not trying to be critical of them, but it it's, I am, it's hard at the same time . It's hard to write difficult. It's

Speaker 3:

Hard to write song as a band when you're like the focal point. Like we all show up to school and you're essentially the teacher mm-hmm

Speaker 1:

<affirmative> you know? So when, yeah, when Paul is saying that essentially to, to George, where he is like, look, I keep trying to tell you this, but you just keep responding in , in a way that's like invalidating to me, like give me something. Yeah. You're not saying anything. They just kind of like stare at Paul, but he's like, well , why don't , what do you think? Should we should do this? Should we do that? Yeah . They're like invalidating. Yeah . So of course Paul is going to be like, play this because you're not doing anything for me. Yeah. So play this otherwise we're not gonna get anything done today. Yeah . And then we're gonna leave. And oftentimes if nothing gets done, it's probably him that gets blamed or something. Yeah. So, or he fears that at least. And that's when George walked off, that's when George walked off. But I was totally on the side of Paul in that argument. Yeah. To a certain extent. And the rest of the documentary I thought was kind of weird. Uh , you were reading earlier a review where it focused more on the songs of Paul mm-hmm <affirmative> and how they wrote Paul. So songs and I thought like, there are moments where Paul's sitting on the piano and he's, you know, playing these songs for the people that are always around the band mm-hmm <affirmative> and they're just like, their eyes are, are , are like glossed over like poppy dogging to this guy. Mm-hmm <affirmative> and yeah, it's Paul McCartney, but he's just a human being. Yeah. And they kind of like, you know, metaphorically, suck his Dick, you know? Yeah. Put him on a pedestal, they put him on a pedestal and he's eating it up. Like, you know, he's playing all these different songs and he is talking about his songs. And to me it came off kind of narcissistic. Yeah . Personally, I don't know if that was the context, but in the context was shown in the documentary. Yeah. That's how it came . That's how it came across to me. Yeah. And that very, very much could have been true because you know, he is Paul McCartney. See, now it's sounding like I've got a bad review of this again . No know it's turning into McCartney three

Speaker 3:

Again. No, no , it's not. Um , well I guess I kind of answers that question. I was gonna say, I was like, well , much Beatle . Do you relate to the most in

Speaker 1:

The documentary? Actually, I don't relate to Paul the most, just , just that circum just in that moment. But I relate to George the most yeah . Through it. Because maybe in the past days, like when we were in a band, I would've related more to Paul. Yeah. But nowadays, yeah . Like more George I'm like standing there, like George being critical of these phenomenal songwriters that are also idiots. Yeah. You know , and his best friends, it's the classic caricature of, you know, the famous person. Yeah . You know , they're these spoiled people. Yeah. And they obviously got out of it or you would think that they got out of it eventually or their , uh , public relations made it look like they've gotten out of that at this point in their lives. Yeah. But at that moment in, in 1968 or 69, they seemed very full of themselves. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Well, I mean you take a , not George and Ringo. No. Yeah. But if you take a step back, step back, step back, get back , uh , fry and pan <laugh> . Uh , no, but if, if you look, if you're in their old brown shoes, <laugh> anyways. Um , but seriously though, like if you're in their shoes, put yourself in their shoes and you've made as much success as they have, and they haven't even hit their thirties yet. Yeah. You know, that's, I feel like inevitably you would get to a point like that, especially when you're all crossing path and wanting to do your own things, there's gonna be a lot of frustration going on. Mm-hmm <affirmative> , you know , Paul's motivated and wants to get things done. He just to play live again. John's um , I don't know . I just wanna be with YOKA all the time. George was like, can I get a song in, on an album? That'd be nice. Or I'm gonna leave the band and Ringo pretty much Ringo is on the drums. Like, are we a band still? <laugh> like confused, you know? Yeah. But he's a , he's phenomenal drummer. I feel like if I was to re relate to , to anybody, it would have to be Ringo. You think so? Yeah. Either Ringo or George. Cause I'm not Paul. I'm not writing like beautiful melodies on pianos by myself having people's eyes glossed over and I'm not John, you know? Yeah. I , I feel like as much as I idolize both those guys and love those guys and I've never met them in my life, but I , I love all the music that they've produced, cuz it's gotten me through a lot of hard times in my life. Um, but I feel like I relate more to Ringo , like as a drummer and being in a band and being in that position and that throne and that chair mm-hmm , <affirmative> just observing like from bird , bird , nest view, you're just like, what the is going on? And he's silent the most in the whole film. Yeah . Like he's more silent than

Speaker 1:

George , right? Yeah. He says like three things.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. He's like a folded pole <laugh> you might want to get away. Yeah. You know, that's true. He did . He did say that to Paul in part three, check it out . But you know, for sure, I agree . He , he probably feels the most vulnerable absolutely. In the whole, because just like I said, you're like, he's not writing the songs, he's just playing to them and he's playing what they want him to play. So he's essentially just sitting there waiting for something to form something to exactly . In order to do his job. He's

Speaker 1:

Almost like a spectator to a certain extent. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

But yeah , I , I feel , um , the most connected to him. So I relate the most to him.

Speaker 1:

I'm gonna tie this into , uh , something that's very true to , uh, our thoughts tonight and uh, you know, bore yard talks about television quite a bit. Mm-hmm <affirmative> in regards with regard to , uh, the hyper real and, and the world and consumerism. I mean, it's, it's , uh , inextricable from a , our world mm-hmm <affirmative> and our culture. And uh , he talks about reality TV a bit . And, and I think if I'm not mistaken, his criticism of things that are like behind the scenes or things that are like reality TV, it's like we no longer watch TV. The television watches us because what we're in this constant to search for real what's real, you know, mm-hmm <affirmative> for what reason? I can't remember exactly. He never, I don't know. Maybe he does answer why we're constantly in the search, but that's how we seek our fulfillment is by seeking out reality for comfort. Exactly. But we are in this search constantly confronted with hyper the hyper reel mm-hmm <affirmative> and I think the Beatles get back documentary again is just, it's another expression of, of hyper reality where it's like, we're watching these guys mm-hmm <affirmative>, you know, and we don't even know still if, if this is really how they are in terms of personality, because we're watching nip it . Yeah . Like such a fragment of their lives. Yeah .

Speaker 3:

A month, a month edited each day,

Speaker 1:

Each day. Yeah . 20 minutes each day. Pretty much like if I, if I took 20 minutes of footage of your life every day for a month and edited it all together, do you think that would be an accurate representation of your entire personality? I don't

Speaker 3:

Exactly . If you can edit it , it however you want, however

Speaker 1:

You want just

Speaker 3:

That alone. Just like when not to like bash on the news or anything, but mm-hmm <affirmative> they can film things, bash all you want.

Speaker 1:

Yeah. I know . They deserve to be

Speaker 3:

Bash on you . You can film things and narrate it however you want to. And whatever you film isn't full shots. It's only snippets of it. <affirmative> and you , you can create your own narrative by the things you say. Absolutely . And the shots that you have and what you leave out

Speaker 1:

Very easy to do,

Speaker 3:

You put , and then you broadcast it on every single TV. And then you got people that are like questioning it and asking like the Yoko narrative. Yeah, exactly. And then you got people that just eat that up and you're like, this is the truth. Mm-hmm <affirmative> , you know, like this is it's set in stone. It was on the news. I'm like, don't you have a brain <laugh> like, do you think like, just cuz it's on the news, like some things yeah. Show me some factual proof like that tornado that ran through the states and caused total destruction. Mm-hmm <affirmative> I I'm gonna believe that because I saw it and then I fact checked it, you know, and it's sad and it's like, oh yeah, Merry Christmas. That sucks. Mm-hmm <affirmative> but I don't believe everything I hear on the news.

Speaker 1:

Good. Yeah, absolutely. And it's like, this has stripped one narrative and added another it's stripped away the narrative that was made in the, let it be documentary. Yeah. And the Yoko , uh , nonsense. Yeah. Uh , and added a new narrative, whatever that narrative is. I think that if we give it some time , we'll probably see what, like the general consensus

Speaker 3:

Of it is watch like

Speaker 1:

Five more times they kind of Disney it, you know?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. To a certain extent. I mean, but at the same time,

Speaker 1:

I really just don't sound like I like this document. No

Speaker 3:

You do. I know you do. Uh , they had to Disney it, it was on Disney plus, but I don't think dis need it so much. I think they just edited out certain things like things that you can't say mm-hmm <affirmative>. Um, but I think overall the presentation was like phenomenal and I agree. It was, it was beautiful. Just like watching these humans interact, you know, we all have our own opinions and it , everything, but the whole film itself was like a gift. I agree. Something I wish I could have seen with my own two eyes , like in real life, not hyper reality life, you know,

Speaker 1:

We're gonna go ahead and do our final thoughts and uh, talk about our final thoughts on the , uh, get back documentary. Yep . Do you wanna start or should I go first? You go first. All right . So my , uh, final thought on this , uh , was that it was, it was great from, from a perspective of like a beetle fan and uh, somebody that just wanted to watch something entertaining. It was definitely that from the perspective of somebody who is like, I guess like searching the philosophy and phenomenology of this. Yeah. I think it was a little more honest than the , the past documentary, but still you can only get so honest yeah . You know, with, with media. Yeah . And I think that people shouldn't be so quick to clean their narratives of these guys just by this footage that they've seen. They're they're great. But I think that there's , they have a lot of flaws and people need to remember that there's a lot

Speaker 3:

More to show exactly that was led

Speaker 1:

On there's there's no reason to, to create a larger than life thing at these normal guys. And that's this that's, what's special about them. In my opinion, my favorite part was watching the late Beatles play early Beatles songs. Yeah . Which is something I've always wanted to see. Yeah. And it gave me that. And that's why, you know, one of the main reasons I gave it a nine outta 10. Yeah . That's my final

Speaker 3:

Thought. My final thought is I connected to it on a musical standpoint as a musician. And I gotta see things that I, I hope to see some things I didn't get to see, but it was just nice having an insight on the, a day in the life of their lives. And it also inspired me to want to play music more.

Speaker 1:

Definitely. Definitely. Like

Speaker 3:

I picked up a guitar right after, right after I finished the film, I was like, I gotta learn one of these songs, man . Like it , it was so here ,

Speaker 1:

You know, we used to play so much music. Like just like them. I mean, that's another thing. Our , their process reminded me a lot of like how we used to jam. Yeah . Even the room they were jamming and kind of looked like your , uh , room upstairs at the shop . Yeah . The shop. Yeah . And I was like, wow, this is really reminiscent. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

It spoke to me though. I loved it. It was great. Well , I think that's it.

Speaker 1:

All right . Our thoughts tonight, that was a special edition . Uh we'll catch you next time. Our thoughts tonight. Five thoughts

Speaker 3:

Tonight.

Speaker 4:

Oh . To write a song that has no meaning at all That doesn't touch a or he , the social call That no , no . A down That has no right to Rome . That doesn't need a reason to waste time with soldiers like that all time . Rock roll with the easy chords and soul . Give rock roll . Oh . To sing a song that doesn't let it all hang out. That doesn't wave any flag or having a slogan to shout that knows no Easter or west that has no lift or raise that doesn't throw any stones or look for any fight . Just like that old time . I can roll with the easy chords and a touch . So give me all time , rock and roll. And I say , whoa , whoa , whoa . Just to write a song that won't man , the broken heart , the world , will you like a lover or promise a brand new start that doesn't preach of rain and fire or heat, any higher coal that doesn't need a reason to mean nothing at all. Just like that old time rocking room with the easy corns and a Touche . So give all time can roll . And I think BA whoa , whoa . Just like that old time rocking, roll with the easy chords and a touch of soul . Give me all turn , rock and roll. And I think bababa whoa , whoa , whoa , whoa . I .